sexta-feira, março 31, 2006

Doctors call premature babies ‘bed blockers’

The Sunday Times March 26, 2006

Sarah-Kate Templeton, Medical Correspondent

PREMATURE babies who require months of expensive intensive care in neonatal units have been labelled “bed blockers” by one of Britain’s royal colleges of medicine.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) says the huge efforts to save babies born under 25 weeks are hampering the treatment of other infants with a better chance of survival and a healthy life.

As the NHS faces an increasing financial crisis, with beds being closed and jobs axed, it says these very premature babies are “blocking” much-needed intensive care cots, sometimes forcing expectant mothers with potentially healthier babies to be transported by ambulance to other hospitals.

In a submission to a two-year inquiry into premature babies by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, the college says: “Some weight should be given to the economic considerations as there is a real issue in neonatal units of ‘bed blocking’, whereby women have to be transferred in labour to other units, compromising both their and their babies’ care.”

The statement reflects a growing view among child specialists that babies born under 25 weeks should be denied intensive care and allowed to die.Next month the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health will debate a motion at its annual conference that it is “unethical” to provide intensive care routinely to babies born under 25 weeks. In practice, they would only be saved in exceptional circumstances.

It would shift Britain towards practice in Holland, the only European country that accepts such babies should die. One paediatrician opposing such a change described it as “involuntary euthanasia”. However, Susan Bewley, chairwoman of the ethics committee of the RCOG, said: “I would prefer that every baby could be treated, but we cannot get away from the fact resources are not endless.”

About 800 babies are born each year under 25 weeks. Medical advances mean about 39% of those born at 24 weeks now survive, and 17% of those at 23 weeks. A normal-term baby is born at 40 weeks.

The cost of treating very premature babies is high. A neonatal intensive care bed costs about £1,000 a day and very premature babies can require intensive care for four months.

Research to be presented at the Royal College of Paediatrics conference shows babies born at 25 weeks or under cost almost three times as much to educate by the time they reach the age of six as those born at full term — £9,500 a year compared with £3,900.

Professor Sir Alan Craft, president of the Royal College of Paediatrics, said: “Many paediatricians would be in favour of adopting the Dutch model of no active intervention for these very little babies. The vast majority of children born at this gestation who do survive have significant disabilities. There is a lifetime cost and that needs to be taken into the equation when society tries to decide whether it wants to intervene.”

Any change to a Dutch model would be opposed by parents such as those of Joey McCormick, born three weeks ago at 24 weeks’ gestation. Doctors say he has a 90% chance of living. His father Daniel McCormick, a chef from Norwich, said: “The doctors behind the proposals must regard Joey as a number and an expense, but to us he is our little boy.”

Joey’s doctor, Paul Clarke, a neonatologist, said: “To me it all sounds too much like attempts to bring in involuntary euthanasia at the opposite end of life.”

David Thomas, from Oxford, was born at 24 weeks, spent 4Å months in hospital but now at two is healthy. His mother Michelle, a psychiatric nurse, said: “Not to have given David the right to life would have been unethical.”

terça-feira, março 28, 2006

ASBO crazy

Why Britain has gone...

Asbo crazy
Special Investigation by Tim Rayment, Sunday Times, 26 de Março

Family rows. . . overgrown hedges . . . doorstep deshabille. All these ‘offences’ could earn you an antisocial behaviour order that is designed to curb yobs

Here is a happy Asbo story; happy, that is, from every viewpoint except one. I have a neighbour who is difficult. Everyone knows this: I was warned about him before I moved in. He’s aggressive, they said. When he has a point to make, he will emerge from his house with a baseball bat. Some people are so scared of him, they have sold up and moved away.

So, before buying my house three years ago, I knocked on his door. He made me welcome and I risked going ahead. We even became friendly, although I could see why people lived in fear, and I could feel the background tension.

Last year, my neighbour was being a mild version of his usual self. From what I gather, he sat on land that overlooks a person he dislikes and glared in a hostile manner. He also parked his car in a deliberately obstructive way. These are not usually criminal offences. Then suddenly he was gone. He had been taken to prison.

If you have lived with stress, you will know it is only when the cause is removed that you realise for the first time how much tension you accepted as normal. In our community of a dozen houses, anxiety would come and go as the cars did. If my neighbour’s car was in its place, tension was raised. But for two months, everyone relaxed. He went to jail because an intimidating stare and some obstructive parking breached his Asbo. So they took him from our midst, just like that.

God will be my judge on Iraq, Tony Blair said recently; but at home, his legacy is the Asbo. After a slow start, local authorities everywhere are seeking them. Last year so many were handed out that one researcher calculates we’ll all have one by 2016. Caroline Shepherd, 27, was served with one because she scandalised her Scottish neighbours by opening the front door in her underwear. (As Cherie Blair almost did, the morning after Tony Blair’s election victory – see previous pages.) Stefan Noremberg, 42, has one for moving his furniture too loudly, as well as being a bad neighbour in other ways. Kim Sutton, 24, is banned from dipping a toe or finger in any river or canal, in case she tries to kill herself – in effect, making it a crime to be mentally ill. Targeted initially at the persistent offenders who make neighbourhood life a misery, they now cut across the classes. Paul Weiland, the film director behind Mr Bean, is among those facing an Asbo: his offence is not to trim the leylandii trees at his £4m home in Wiltshire, blocking sunlight to next door’s garden.

With 6,497 issued in England and Wales as of June 2005, and 599 in Scotland, the rate of increase is levelling off, but not for long, perhaps. Charles Clarke, the home secretary, thinks that some councils are not keeping up with the municipal Joneses, and wants to embarrass those who have been slow to use Asbos by naming them before local elections in May.

To observers who dislike the authoritarian nature of new Labour, with its culture of supervision and surveillance, the popularity of Asbos must be bewildering (even 67% of Guardian readers support them). But there is no doubt that, for those who suffer from the real but “low-level” abuse that blights lives, they have been a fantastic innovation. All MPs have constituents with despairing stories for which, in the past, there was no easy answer. Now there is.

What makes Asbos an easy remedy is that they are not hard to obtain: only 3% of applications are refused. Let’s take a real case. Suppose your neighbour – a businessman – has no respect for anyone. He warns you that he is a psychopath, and gives you every reason to believe it. He puts cat faeces through your letter box, allows his dog to foul your garden, and intimidates other neighbours by staring into their homes. In the past, you would have had to prove beyond all reasonable doubt that he was responsible for the faeces; he might have laughed off his court appearance, and nothing would have changed. But Asbos are different. First, they are civil cases, even though magistrates hear them, which means that all you need to show is that on the balance of probabilities, the businessman acts as you and your neighbours describe. You can even give evidence without the accused ever knowing your name. But the order, once granted, has a hidden bite. Asbos are designed to inhibit people from repeating behaviour that others find unacceptable, and to breach them is a criminal offence, punishable by up to five years in prison. Five years for interfering with your letter box: that’s a weapon. At least, it is if the courts take the breach seriously, but we’ll come to that later.

Unsurprisingly, Asbos have reached parts of British life the authors of the legislation cannot have imagined. Abusive landlords are prevented from threatening tenants or unlawfully evicting them. Violent husbands are banned from causing alarm or distress to their wives. Dundee city council is contemplating the use of Asbos in schools, to stop pupils disrupting classes or being bullies. The legislation has been used to turn prostitution, drinking and begging into crimes: in North Yorkshire, for example, police looked through the window of Ripon and District Social Club and saw Tom Kelly, a young bricklayer, having a drink two days before Christmas. Because of persistent bad behaviour, including assault, criminal damage and public-order offences, entering licensed premises breached his Asbo. His workmates hid him under a table, but this did not save him from being sent to prison for five months.

Thomas Brown, a flasher from the Isles of Scilly, has been banned from speaking to any female, except for members of his family, in any public place in the UK. In east London, residents are experimenting with “Asbo TV”, giving them access to 400 CCTV cameras so they can compare suspicious characters with an on-screen gallery of Asbo recipients. Children are not exempt from all this: although the original intention was to use the orders mainly against adults, almost half go to juveniles. The age of the youngest has been creeping down: in 2003, four years into this great social experiment, to be 17 and to receive an Asbo was enough to make the newspapers; now, you need to be 11. According to the Home Office, more than 160 have been issued to children aged between 10 and 12.

Storm-toss’d lovers have been caught in the net: Kirsty Smith, 22, had to go to court when seven months pregnant to contest an Asbo preventing her from living with the father of her child, after police were called 40 times to their home in southwest London. She fancied the pants off 43-year-old Christopher Rabess; he was so shy when they met, he could not eat; but their rows were spectacular. They argued that the ban on living together was against their human rights, and last month she was allowed to move back in. The original terms were that she was not to go within five miles of his home, and he was not to contact her, but a modified Asbo instructs them not to put one another or their neighbours in fear or distress for two years.

The proving ground for Asbos is Manchester. This is not because Manchester is a bad place, even if it has deep social problems and the country’s highest rate of car crime. It is because there is an enthusiasm. Manchester understands Asbos, and Charles Clarke is pleased with Manchester. Of the 6,497 issued, 938 have been in the city, which leads London despite a population one-third the size. Labour councillors argue that they have nothing to be ashamed of: if you have money, you can buy yourself out of problem neighbourhoods, and Asbos protect those who have less choice over where they live. Agreed. But do they work?

Let us visit one area: Monsall, to the east of the city. This is a small, clearly defined estate, with a strong sense of belonging. As it is small, surely social policy will work here. In the community centre, those in charge know everyone who comes in. But the street cleaners work only in the early morning, before the estate’s feared teenagers are about; shards of glass that are too small for them to pick up show that no car is safe.

The cleaners are not wimps. An example of a Monsall Asbo is that of Lewis Cook, who was first arrested at the age of 10. He has five convictions for theft and receiving, two for possessing cannabis, and more for assaulting police officers, criminal damage, and carrying a locking knife. His Asbo was granted in 2004, when he was 17, because of evidence that he and others had gathered in his road with baseball bats, knives and bars. They had also been seen “using foul and abusive language… and drinking alcohol and shouting on separate occasions”. The order bans him from just about everywhere, except for the roads he must use to visit his grandparents or go home; even there, he is not allowed to be on the street for any other reason. It makes it a crime for him to communicate with 11 named friends, or to be “with more than two people in public”.

Another Monsall story. I went to see Doris Lewis, 70, who has four grandchildren who are forbidden to visit her because she cannot control them when they do. (The list of allegations against one includes burglary, criminal damage, indecent exposure to a 10-year-old, and terrorising Cub Scouts.) It was my second visit to the area and I was still naive. I thought I was being careful; I parked around the corner so that nobody would see me remove the satellite-navigation device, and hide it, with other valuables and the notebooks containing two months’ work, in a scruffy carrier bag. On Lewis’s doorstep, I had my back to this bag for about 90 seconds, and a teenager stole it. Naturally, I chased him along three streets, shouting in a Shakespearian voice: “Stop that man!” The shouts brought people out of their houses, but only after we had flashed past, and I lost him after he turned the fourth corner. (We were now near the home, by the way, of another person I wanted to visit, who felt so terrorised by the five girls next door, aged 9 to 17, that she hid her baby in a cupboard.) Reporting the crime proved taxing: the phone box on the corner was not working – what a surprise, said a resident later – and the thief had my mobile. At home that evening it was impossible to get through to the police because of other people’s urgent calls. When I did get them at 6.30am the next day, a friendly officer related his Mancunian story: he had stepped out of his car to knock on a friend’s door, leaving the keys in the ignition and his wife in the back, when a “nipper” got in to steal it, wife and all.

Doris Lewis witnessed my theft with the deadpan expression of someone for whom nothing was new. What struck me was the teenager: when I turned round, seconds before he took the bag, he made no effort to hide what he was about to do. “They have no fear,” says Pauline Madden, 75, another grandmother on the estate. “Our children are delightful,” says the secretary of the local primary school, with total sincerity. “I don’t know what happens to them.” The secretary – speaking moments after a man who had come to fix the school photocopier had his satellite navigation nicked, too – thinks there is a lookout in one of the estate’s four small tower blocks. This would explain why I drove onto the estate and had my stuff pinched two minutes later.

You get the picture. This is a strong community, but it is not a place to be a dreamer, as I am, or weak. Last summer there was a community-pride meeting in Monsall; a Spanish lorry driver had the misfortune to park outside the meeting place because he was lost. Talk of community pride was interrupted by the sound of people breaking into the lorry and then, when they found it empty, assaulting the driver with rocks. The police were called, but did not come.

If anyone needs Blair’s protection, it is the people of this estate. They include residents with ordinary working lives – the streets are empty of cars during the day – and the highest aspirations for their children. Take Anne Barratt, 64, a shy grandmother who provides some of the glue for the estate’s fabric, by working as a volunteer at the community centre and as a school dinner lady. Her grandson Matthew can be seen in an old BBC film, made in the 1990s when the estate was at its worst, playing a game of hunt-the-rats under the mattresses and other rubbish outside abandoned houses. Today he is at university, studying to be a graphic designer.

Have Asbos helped? The city council has an intelligent approach: the orders are part of a suite of measures to try to prevent trouble as well as to punish it. There are parenting classes for those struggling to manage children’s behaviour; contracts to encourage parents to take responsibility for what their children do; Asbo warning interviews, which seek to identify what help a young person needs to stay out of trouble; and activities to keep them occupied, such as trips to the swimming pool and a recent outing to the Lake District. New tenants are given a period of probation: they know if they or their children do not behave, they will lose their home.

Alas, the problems go deeper than policy can reach – at least, as policy is practised at the moment. One obstacle is cultural. Almost nobody talks to the authorities, for fear of being seen as a grass. “The reason I looked at you as if you was dirty,” one young mother explained helpfully, “is because I thought you was undercover police.” When joyriders race round the streets, nobody says anything. Live and let live. How do you enforce an Asbo if nobody reports that it is being breached?

Then there is the difficulty of getting hold of the police, even if you wanted to. Sadder still is that there are residents who used to call, but have given up because of what happens when cases reach court. “I think it was 1999, the first Asbo,” says Ken Moran, who runs the community centre, “and the idea you could ring up the police and say, oh, I’ve seen someone doing that, and something would be done about it, was great. Then people rang and nothing happened. And nothing happened 20 times. And they think: well, why bother? The police have actually said to us, there is no point in us [reporting things] because they get to court and the judge lets them out. They’re home in time for tea, you know. That’s made the Asbo pretty much a laughing stock.”

To address the “no grassing” culture, the authorities have introduced neighbourhood wardens, who patrol the estate as the eyes and ears of the police. The wardens carry leaflets that distinguish them from law enforcers, presenting them as ordinary people, “here for you, your mates and the rest of your neighbourhood”. No handcuffs! No batons! No CS gas! We’re not the police! The weakness of this is that they have no power, and everyone knows it. Nobody on Monsall reports anything to them, either. In some parts of the country, these brave and friendly figures have the authority to issue fixed penalties, which would seem a good idea here, too.

I meet a group of mothers, most of whom had their first babies as teenagers. Asbos have made no difference at all, they say. What would you do instead? “Kill ’em all,” says a mother of four, before thinking about this for a moment. “No – if you just killed one, in the middle of the street, and showed everyone. It does need something done, because it is getting out of hand.” Neighbourhood wardens make no difference, she says. “If you hand names in, you wouldn’t be here the next day. Because you’d be f***ing dead. The only time this estate is quiet is when they are all banged up. Or when it’s raining.” (Or when they’re in the Lake District.)

The teenagers look hooded and sinister, as teenagers do. But most are happy to chat as soon as they know we are not the police, and one – 14 years old, and described by an official as one of the biggest scrotums in the area, with an anger-management problem – comes across as particularly sweet and likable. His friend Reece even blushes when I ask if his name is spelt with an S. “That’s the girl’s way,” he protests.

It is obvious that these boys need something to do. There is no playground on the estate, and the days when teenagers would get on a bus and go swimming are a fond memory. These lads don’t go anywhere, except in a stolen car. They will go swimming if you take them, but not otherwise. The community centre has active youth groups, but these have little to offer. “We get people up to 15 or 16. But sometimes at 12 that’s it,” says Moran, “because we have nothing to offer them. We can’t offer them drugs or let them steal cars. We can’t let them vandalise anything.” So the boys hang about the streets and get bored. Some of them – and there are no young women on the street, for some reason – show entrepreneurial spirit and a faith in officialdom. “Can’t you put a track over there for us?” ask three who are astride off-road motorbikes. (One has a mud-spattered toddler on the front, without a crash helmet, aged two.) They built these bikes themselves; to make one took four years. They would build the track, too, if only the council would give them one of the empty fields that are about. They even signed a petition asking for it. Nothing happened.

Have Asbos had any effect? No, say these young men, an answer that by now is expected. But there is a hint that the orders do have results. “I’d rather go to prison than have an Asbo,” says one of the bikers. “When you’re on an Asbo, the police hassle you 24 hours a day. So you may as well be inside, where the police can’t bother you and you’re just sat there, doing what you’re doing anyway. The Asbos don’t work whatsoever. You just want to throw that in the bin.” Whereas in prison you can sit doing nothing with your mates and take drugs in peace, which is better.

Like most of the public, I want to support Asbos. I still think they are a powerful innovation for beleaguered people. But there is a difference between my community, where Asbo recipients are few and the police easy to reach, and this one. Monsall might be small, with a population of 570, but it needs intensive effort to enforce the orders. I was on my sixth visit to Monsall before I saw a neighbourhood warden; I saw police, but always in cars, and as one officer said, all the lads round here look the same. The moral is obvious. Only if Asbos are seen to be enforced will residents in the toughest areas start to support them again. The orders are weakest where they are needed most. Much of the responsibility lies with the courts. “I don’t think Asbos have worked,” says a young neighbourhood warden, who was willing to be quoted but goes unnamed to protect his job. “Twenty-five per cent of them work, but the rest, the kids breach. I’ve been to court four times, and what’s been given by the judge is a slap on the wrists. There should be something sterner to replace the Asbo, like boot camp, where they can actually learn something.”

More likely is that the government will start to dock the benefit payments of antisocial households, an idea first put forward by Frank Field, Blair’s blue-skies social thinker. The objection to this is that cutting benefits affects only the poor. Better-off offenders would face only the penalties imposed by the courts, while the poor face double jeopardy. I have never understood this argument. By definition, the poor live among the poor, which means it is other poor people who suffer. As the motive is to give peace to the majority, the idea should be tested – with a pilot scheme on Monsall, perhaps. The real results come when effort is expended on one family, and however uncomfortable we might be with the idea that the state should intervene in parenting, somebody has to.

Manchester does have success stories. One family – not in Monsall – seemed beyond help. A mother and five children were moving from one address to another, while the father was in prison on a long sentence. Neighbours suffered racist and verbal abuse, loud music, vandalism, stone-throwing, joyriding and theft from local shops, which are exactly the low-level offences Asbos are meant to combat. The city council sought injunctions, eviction proceedings and Asbos against three of the children. But it also brought in its Tenancy Support Plus team, which taught the mother to praise her children and introduce routines. “This family,” said a council spokesman carefully, “is now moving towards eligibility for rehousing on an introductory tenancy basis.”

Close supervision has worked on the other side of the Pennines too. Leeds city council asked for an Asbo restricting Leeford Walker, 19, to be lifted after he dropped his friends and, helped by a strong relationship with a key worker, became a mentor for other young people. He hopes to be a youth worker or a soldier. “My life’s changed so much,” said the former burglar and drug dealer, who is now the father of a toddler. “If they’d sent me to jail instead of giving me an Asbo, I’d have got into more trouble.”

“The Asbo has done me good,” says Tiffany Woods, 17, also from Leeds, who was identified as a troublemaker because of the company she kept. “I’ve got a job and my own place, and I don’t bother with a lot of those people any more. It’s got me away from that area.”

Was Liberty, the civil-rights group, right to say: “We must not become an Asbo land, where it is a crime to be irritating or to be a child”? Is Harry Fletcher, of the National Association of Probation Officers, right that some councils “are using the powers to drive off the streets anybody whose behaviour is eccentric, undesirable or a nuisance”? In a few well-publicised cases, yes.

But in the real world, somebody has to intervene when people behave badly, and low-level nuisance has a high-level effect on people’s lives.

Like anything involving the state, the use of Asbos needs watching. That is the role of newspapers, and of groups such as Asbo Concern. The orders need enforcing, too. Many are: more than 1,000 people have been imprisoned for breaching one. Ask Marion Beresford, of Glasgow, who spent Christmas and New Year behind bars for ignoring complaints about music blaring from her flat. Or Howard Sanders, from Cornwall, who swung his wife round by the arm, causing her to fall, breaching an order that he was not to harass or assault her. He was jailed for 21/2 years. These imprisonments either cheer you or chill you; possibly both.

For now, the home affairs select committee has concluded that the government’s Asbo policy is just about right. The public agrees. The great social experiment is just beginning.

segunda-feira, março 27, 2006

O que fazer com o PSD e o PP?

por Luís Delgado, Jornalista, in DN, 27 de Março de 2006

O PSD e o PP, quais irmãos gémeos, mas de mães e pais diferentes (?), marcaram as suas decisões de liderança para o início de Maio, um com as directas e o outro com o congresso extraordinário. Em termos de estratégia, quem beneficia e quem perde com estas involuções?

PSD

Apareça ou não um outro candidato, Mendes prepara-se para renovar o seu mandato, agora reforçado e legitimado por uma eleição directa, seguida de um congresso aclamatório. É a estratégia dele, mas não a que melhor convém ao PSD, nesta altura.

Por esta hora ainda se desconhece se Filipe Menezes avança, mas bom seria que o fizesse, porque daria uma luta interessante e, mais do que isso, marcaria sempre a insatisfação que cresce, em surdina, nas hostes sociais-democratas.

Convém ser claro, mas sem magoar Marques Mendes: ele nunca será um grande líder, porque lhe falta tudo para essa função: carisma, empolgamento, ideias e força. Mendes é, e sempre será, um óptimo número dois do partido, um arrumador da casa, um contador de militantes, um organizador das bases, um substituto do que há-de vir, mas nunca, jamais, um líder nato.

Mantendo-se Marques Mendes, quem vai ganhar? O PS e Sócrates - já se viu neste primeiro ano - e o PP, se tiver a inteligência necessária para mudar de liderança e iniciar já o seu processo de reafirmação.

PP

Ribeiro e Castro sempre sofreu de um dilema, que nada tem a ver com o CDS/PP que conhecemos. É um democrata-cristão à moda antiga, honrado e sério, lutador e brilhante no discurso. É, como se viu, um homem sem medo, que vira um congresso com um discurso. Mas falta-lhe o essencial: não se revê no PP dos últimos sete ou oito anos, e o PP não se vê na sua moderação centrista e distanciada do combate político.

Por isso têm uma bancada parlamentar combativa, que esbate o PSD, capaz de embaraçar politicamente Sócrates, sem remorsos do passado recente, nem com contas para ajustar, e tudo isso nada tem a ver com o líder, que faz recordar Freitas do Amaral quando regressou, mal, ao CDS, tentando colocá-lo numa posição que nada tinha com o seu espectro político natural.

O PP é assumidamente um partido de direita, com naturais preocupações que derivam do seu conservadorismo cristão e de base social, mas pragmático e suficientemente agressivo para combater em todas as frentes.

Assim sendo, e se ponderadas apenas razões estratégicas, o PP só beneficiaria se mudasse agora de liderança, porque ocuparia o espaço do PSD, na sua margem mais à direita, e seria a verdadeira oposição de direita e centro-direita no Parlamento, se Mendes continuar como líder.

Por outras palavras, o PP, como sempre acontece, ocuparia o espaço vazio que o PSD está a criar e a alargar, e isso credibilizaria e alargaria a sua base de apoio. É um momento histórico que não se repetirá, e convém que a lucidez impere no novo congresso. É agora ou nunca, e oportunidades destas não se perdem nem se deixam passar, impunemente.

A manter-se tudo, o PP será um clone do PSD, mas pequenino e sem garantias de resistência. A quem agradaria tudo isto? A Marques Mendes e a José Sócrates. Um não se mexeria e o outro faria o que bem entendesse, como até agora.

PS

Está no melhor dos mundos, a governar sem oposição visível, e a fazer tudo o que quer e deseja.

Mas não é tudo: Sócrates, muito parecido com Blair, ou com a nova vaga de socialistas que são tudo menos o que dizem ser, está a ocupar, devagar, mas com consistência, o lugar em aberto deixado pelo PSD e pelo PP.

É extraordinário como dezenas de medidas governamentais, nos últimos tempos, são tipicamente de centro-direita e direita, e isso só lhe mostra o génio.

Deixem-no andar que um dia se arrependerão. Sócrates mete Marques Mendes e Ribeiro e Castro no bolso.

Fim de subsídios põe em causa criação dos burros mirandeses

Ana Fragoso, in Público, 27 de Março de 2006

Criadores portugueses confrontados com incentivos à promoção da raças autóctones no outro lado da fronteira

A suspensão das ajudas à manutenção das raças autóctones anunciada pelo ministro da Agricultura está a gerar alguma frustração nos criadores de burros de raça mirandesa, ainda mais porque a proximidade com Espanha lhes mostra uma realidade bem diferente. António Rio, de 49 anos, residente na Póvoa, concelho de Miranda do Douro, tem actualmente duas burras e pensa em vender a mais pequena. "Criei-a e mantive-a em casa a contar com o subsídio que recebia, mas parece que o querem cortar, assim não vale a pena mantê-la", revelou ao PÚBLICO, durante uma feira de burros de raça zamorana-leonesa, em San Vitero, Espanha, a escassos dez quilómetros da fronteira portuguesa.
Neste certame, o criador português contactou uma realidade bem diferente: "Aqui, os criadores recebem ajudas para tudo e depois os animais são valorizados, o que não acontece em Portugal", lamentou. "Estive aí a ver as burras que estão em leilão e um animal com dez meses custa 1800 euros, eu tenho em casa uma burra bem mais velha, melhor do que qualquer uma destas e nem 1500 euros me dão por ela", acrescentou. De facto, num leilão com cerca de 30 burricas foi vendida uma fêmea com dez meses por mais de dois mil euros.
Urbano Fernandez, um criador de 75 anos natural de San Vitero, referiu que na realidade "compensa criar esta raça protegida em Espanha". Os animais inscritos no livro genealógico da raça "não têm preço", revelou o criador. Castor Fernandes, de 74 anos, também de San Vitero, acrescenta que compensa trabalhar com aquela raça protegida, mesmo que a intenção não seja levar os animais a leilão. "Aqui recebemos apoios que chegam da União Europeia, mas também ajudas da própria Deputação de Zamora, que nos atribuir 180 euros anuais por animal", explicou.

Trabalho de quatro
anos "posto em causa"
Jesus Perez, presidente da associação de protecção da raça zamorana-leonesa, explicou que em Espanha existem duas áreas de actuação que visam incentivar a criação desta raça: "Por um lado contamos com apoios significativos que chegam de Bruxelas, mas também com apoios das instituições locais; por outro, queremos valorizar a raça, e pouco a pouco vamos aumentando o preço dos animais, para que o negócio se torne lucrativo para os criadores".
Este dirigente associativo é também ele criador de burros "há 16 anos". Conhece a realidade portuguesa e afirma que as entidades governamentais estão a seguir um mau caminho: "Existe uma política agrícola comum, que devia trazer o mesmo nível de apoios para os agricultores da comunidade, mas não é isso que acontece", referiu. Sem apoios, Jesus Perez adivinha o desaparecimento da raça dos burros mirandeses, "porque, sem estímulos, os criadores abandonam a actividade", sustentou.
Este é o grande receio de Miguel Nóvoa, presidente da Associação para o Estudo e Protecção da Raça Asinina Mirandesa. Ao longo de quatro anos, esta associação tentou motivar os criadores do planalto para a preservação do burro, agora perdeu os argumentos: "O nosso trabalho está em causa devido a uma decisão governamental".
Este dirigente tem esperanças que o ministro da Agricultura ainda possa corrigir o problema "se decidir manter as ajudas aos produtores", mas, socorrendo-se do exemplo espanhol, pede mais: "Nós lutamos por um maior envolvimento de todas as instituições portuguesas, das câmaras ao governo civil, de todos os organismos, para podermos fazer do burro de Miranda um símbolo da região", defendeu.

O lugar do PSD

por Pedro Magalhães, in Publico, 27 de Março de 2006

Imaginem que, num qualquer país da Europa Ocidental, um partido de "centro-esquerda" ganhava eleições prometendo pouco mais que austeridade, contra um partido de "centro-direita" que prometia reduzir impostos e aumentar pensões.
Poucos meses depois, o novo Governo aumentava os impostos. Congelava subsídios e progressões na carreira dos funcionários públicos, aumentava-lhes os salários abaixo da inflação e prometia aumentar-lhes a idade de reforma para 65 anos. Durante o seu primeiro ano de mandato, o desemprego subia para oito por cento, atingindo o valor mais alto em oito anos.
E imaginem agora - e poderá não ser fácil - que, um ano depois das eleições, o partido do Governo era ainda aquele que recolhia mais intenções de voto nas sondagens. Que o primeiro-ministro era o líder partidário com mais altas taxas de aprovação, próximas dos 50 por cento e cerca de 20 pontos percentuais acima das do líder do principal partido de oposição. E que esse líder da oposição, cujo partido tinha recentemente triunfado em duas eleições, era visto unanimemente como um "regente" a prazo, a quem só restaria esperar pela inevitável destituição na véspera das próximas eleições legislativas. Pode não ser fácil imaginar tudo isto, mas não é preciso imaginar: tudo isto se passa em Portugal.
Das várias questões que estes desenvolvimentos levantam, uma das mais importantes é esta: por que será tão difícil ser-se oposição ao actual Governo?
O comentário jornalístico tende a privilegiar explicações circunstanciais: a eficácia, real ou imaginada, da acção do Governo e do primeiro-ministro; a falta de "carisma" de Marques Mendes; os mecanismos de controlo da agenda política ao dispor dos Governos, que este parece saber usar com particular destreza; ou a "memória viva" do consulado Santana Lopes.
Já os politólogos costumam concentrar-se em explicações estruturais que, de resto, estão longe de serem específicas ao caso português ou ao momento presente. Há exactamente 40 anos, numa das raras obras dedicadas à triste condição de se ser "oposição" - Political Oppositions in Western Democracies (Yale University Press) - Robert Dahl, o decano dos cientistas políticos norte-americanos, delineava os traços fundamentais daquilo que estava para vir: um declínio estrutural da "oposição". Segundo Dahl, ao passo que os conflitos entre governo e oposição seriam cada vez menos estruturados em torno de características, interesses e identidades sociais dos eleitorados, retirando-lhes assim conteúdo político e ideológico, estaríamos simultaneamente perante a ascensão de um novo "Leviathan democrático, (...) que reflecte um compromisso com as virtudes do pragmatismo, moderação e mudança incremental; uma política não-ideológica ou anti-ideológica" (p. 399).
O fim da Guerra Fria e o triunfo do capitalismo liberal só acentuaram as tendências detectadas por Dahl. Isto não implica, claro, o fim de toda e qualquer oposição eficaz ao poder, mas tão-só daquela que meramente aspira a substituir aqueles que, de momento, vão manejando a custo as rédeas do "monstro". Resta-lhe apenas esperar pelos fracassos dos Governos e, entretanto - como sustentava há uma semana António Borges, com a habitual densidade ideológica - tentar a "sedução dos eleitores".
Contudo, é possível que o caso do PSD mereça atenção especial. Apesar dos ideólogos do partido terem sempre resistido a classificá-lo ideologicamente, esta indeterminação nem sempre constituiu impedimento a que o PSD encontrasse um papel claro com que se pudesse apresentar ao eleitorado.
Primeiro, e sob Sá Carneiro, o PSD assumiu-se como a força de oposição moderada ao poder militar do pós-25 de Novembro e à sua aliança (com o tempo desfeita) com o PS; mais tarde, e sob Cavaco Silva, como o agente do desmantelamento das "conquistas da revolução" mais manifestamente desfasadas da nossa integração no mundo ocidental.
Completados esses projectos, o que sobrou? O que representa e que lugar ocupa o PSD? A resposta não é evidente. Mais evidente é que, sob a liderança de Cavaco Silva, o PSD se transformou numa manifestação acabada daquilo a que, num famoso artigo de 1995, Richard Katz e Peter Mair chamavam o "partido-cartel", caracterizado pela simbiose entre os quadros do Governo e do Estado e a liderança partidária de topo, pela emergência de uma clivagem entre essa liderança e uma cada vez mais autónoma elite intermédia de líderes regionais e locais e, finalmente, por conflitos internos que têm a ver muito menos com a representação de interesses de segmentos concretos do eleitorado do que com as melhores estratégias para obter e repartir cargos e poder.
Esta sua natureza de "partido-cartel" é, aliás, o maior impedimento a que o PSD se possa assumir, como alguns lhe vão pedindo, como um partido mais claramente liberal do ponto de vista económico. O problema não é tanto o da insensatez eleitoral de semelhante estratégia, mas sim o facto de, com um partido condicionado pela voracidade autárquica e interessado em preservar a cartelização de lugares e recursos do Estado, não há líder a quem se consinta propor a desmontagem do Leviathan.
E entretanto o PS foi mudando. Semelhante ao PSD em muitos dos anteriores aspectos, os seus líderes aproveitaram, no entanto, as sucessivas lutas entre facções ideológicas internas para, quando delas vencedores, utilizarem essa autonomia estratégica para a reconfiguração do discurso do partido de acordo com aquilo que, afinal, tinha sempre sido a sua prática política enquanto poder: a ocupação do lugar cardinal da política moderna que o PSD julgava seu, "entre o centro-esquerda e o centro-direita", o centro do centro.
Hoje, como demonstram sucessivos estudos eleitorais, o "votante mediano" é do PS. Contra isto, pode não restar muito mais para além de esperar pelos fracassos do actual Governo e ir prometendo mais e melhor do mesmo. Contudo, como a débil vitória nas eleições de 2002 e tudo o que se lhe seguiu claramente sugerem, até isso pode já não ser suficiente. politólogo

sexta-feira, março 24, 2006

Cordialmente

Abel Maia, O Primeiro de Janeiro, 24 de Março de 2006

– Miguel Paiva demitiu-se da Comissão Política do PSD – Facto político.

A vida política é geradora de muitos factos, alguns ocos, outros inócuos, e outros ainda opacos, ao lado de muitos outros que são positivos, realizadores e refundadores do significado originário da dita. Pela frente dos factos políticos, numa visão humanista, que prezo, existe a convivialidade, pois a politica “tout court” é feita por Homens. A interacção de personalidades, mesmo que em bancadas políticas diferentes, gera atritos que sendo usuais, não deixam por isso de ser anormais, às vezes doentios, mas deve, sobretudo, gerar afectos. Aprendi nos clássicos que pensar politica, significa pensar a sociedade, cuja concepção é o primeiro pressuposto de qualquer teoria política. Sou mais adepto da teoria integracionista, no sentido de que a “vontade geral” de Rousseau, corresponde a um modelo mais aceitável para o equilíbrio das sociedades. Incomoda-me analisar a organização das sociedades no contexto da conflitualidade Aristotélica, onde tudo se resume aos interesses de gestão de recursos escassos, que atribui ao poder o conceito de soma zero (ou tem poder e tem quantidade positiva de poder ou não tem poder e é objecto de poder).
Que vem isto a propósito daquele facto político? - Indagará o leitor.
Convivi com o Dr. Miguel Paiva durante 16 anos, na assembleia municipal e na câmara municipal. Temos ideias e formas de estar diversas e sempre nos sentamos em bancadas diferentes. Tivemos quezílias e problemas. Escrevi coisas sobre ele, alinhadas com as políticas que preconizei em cada momento. Fui, também, por ele sinalagmaticamente retribuído. Uma ou outra vez, poucas felizmente, ultrapassamos o risco amarelo, mas sempre longe do vermelho. Aprecio uma sociedade democrática, nos valores do respeito e da opinião livre e os meus adversários políticos não são vistos no conceito de poder soma zero. Foram sempre representantes do poder de que estavam instituídos: O poder -dever de oposição. E, por isso, na hora da sua saída, envio um abraço ao Dr. Miguel Paiva, pois serviu ao seu modo aquele conceito integracionista da política, em que cada indivíduo ou grupo representa parte do todo. Não sei se é despedida, mas cumpriu uma etapa ao serviço da “rés”pública, porque estar na militância partidária, longe de ser anátema, é cumprir cidadania. Percebo o seu texto de desalento da semana passada, mas aquilo passa-lhe. Teve a difícil tarefa de puxar, sem grande ajudas, uma carruagem derrotada à partida e à chegada.
Aqui fica o reconhecimento singelo e estou pouco preocupado com algum Maquiavel com atitudes maniqueístas, que faça destas breves palavras um novo facto político.
O politicamente correcto é para outras ocasiões. Não é na hora da despedida.
Cordialmente, é pura cidadania.

Polícias e magistrados dizem que as cidades estão mais violentas

por José Bento Amaro, in Publico, 23 de Março de 2006

No ano passado, 37 por cento da criminalidade participada à PSP foi cometida com armas de fogo

As cidades portuguesas estão mais violentas. Esta é a constatação de Polícia Judicária, PSP, GNR e Ministério Público, que ontem, em Lisboa, no decurso das jornadas de reflexão sobre Criminalidade urbana e violência, concluíram ainda que a proliferação de armas, sobretudo de fogo, está na base do aumento da insegurança.
"Houve uma contenção do crime violento, mas, ao mesmo tempo, um aumento da carga violenta", sintetizou Teresa Almeida, procuradora da República no Departamento de Investigação e Acção Penal (DIAP) de Lisboa. A magistrada, após salientar a "vulgarização do uso de armas de fogo", alertou ainda para o facto de as cidades portuguesas serem, cada vez mais, palco de crimes onde a violência é desnecessária, quase gratuita.
O director nacional da Judiciária, Santos Cabral, focando uma vez mais o facto de haver muitas armas de fogo, lembrou que "são os mais pobres os primeiros a sentir os efeitos da criminalidade violenta, porque saem mais cedo e regressam mais tarde a casa e porque se deslocam em transportes públicos". Depois, recordando que a pobreza e a exclusão escolar podem potenciar a criminalidade, frisou que "é necessário continuar a investir no policiamento de proximidade".
O aumento da agressividade (que encontra um bom exemplo no acréscimo de 30 por cento nos roubos a bancos, carros de transporte de valores e casas de câmbios), é igualmente uma consequência, segundo Teresa Almeida, de "algum desprezo que as administrações central e local têm revelado pela prevenção criminal". A magistrada entende que os órgãos centrais e autárquicos devem dispensar mais atenção a questões como a reorganização urbanística, a iluminação e limpeza dos espaços públicos e ser mais interventivas junto das comunidades, sobretudo nas de imigrantes.

Identificadas cidades mais violentas
As cidades de Lisboa, Porto e Setúbal são as mais violentas do país, seguindo-se-lhes Braga, Faro e Coimbra, afirmou o comandante da Divisão de Investigação Criminal da PSP, subintendente Dário Prates.
"Só na área de intervenção da PSP registou-se, de 2004 para 2005, um acréscimo nos assaltos a bancos na ordem dos 167 por cento", disse Dário Prates, salientando que, da totalidade da criminalidade participada àquela polícia, 37 por cento terá sido praticada com recurso a armas de fogo. "O peso da violência na criminalidade geral foi, no ano passado, de 9,2 por cento, enquanto em 2004 se cifrava nos 8,6 por cento", acrescentou.
O capitão Marques Dias, da GNR, depois de salientar que nas décadas de 70 e 80 a violência dentro dos bairros se devia, em grande parte, a acções de carácter sindical, explicou que esses mesmos locais são, actualmente, pontos quentes onde se encontram pessoas vítimas de exclusão social e financeira.
"O aparecimento de uma farda [nos bairros problemáticos] é considerado uma provocação", disse o mesmo responsável, que depois considerou, na zona de Lisboa, Amadora, Loures, Oeiras, Cascais, Sintra, Vila Franca, Almada e Montijo como os locais mais violentos. Na região do Porto foram apontadas as áreas de Matosinhos, Maia, Trofa, Valongo, Gondomar, Gaia, Vila do Conde e São Mamede de Infesta.

quinta-feira, março 23, 2006

Gripe, livros, televisão e o canal da Fox

José Pacheco Pereira, in Publico, 23 de Março de 2006

Não há nada como a aparição sazonal do vírus da gripe, felizmente de uma forma ainda tradicional e domável, longe da ameaça cada vez mais perto da Grande Gripe das Aves, para remeter a vida de cada um a um infantil conforto da doença, que deve vir dos dias em que não se ia à escola, se ficava na cama, quente e confortável, servido por todos, centro de muito especiais atracções. A gripe já não é o que era, e quase só o frasco azul-escuro e esverdeado do Vicks VapoRub faz essa ponte longínqua com a infância, com o seu cheiro agradável, às coisas que não mudam, mas mudam. O frasco era de vidro e agora é de plástico.
Mas as minhas gripes são sempre grandes momentos de leitura e televisão, o que une o agradável ao agradável e me afasta do mundo obcecado das notícias dos jornais e da agenda política em grande parte artificial. Ao longe vê-se passar a posse presidencial, uma mesinha de chá disfarçada de mesa de trabalho, a agitação de um congresso, os tumultos franceses e, verdadeiramente numa manifestação de egoísmo, o que nos interessa é a pilha de livros a dizerem-me "lê-me", e o pequeno ecrã que não precisa sequer de dizer "vê-me". Eu vejo, eu vejo.
O que eu vi reconciliou-me com a televisão, o que é um lugar-comum porque nunca estive zangado com um meio que particularmente estimo. Digo de outra maneira - reconciliou-me com as séries televisivas, o que já é mais exacto, para um órfão dos Sopranos, que, depois da última série, deixou de encontrar alguma coisa que me prendesse tão regularmente ao ecrã maligno. Até agora e num canal a que nunca tinha dado muita atenção e que aceitei ter (é pago à parte), porque uma menina me telefonou a perguntar se queria um pacote qualquer com o nome de "familiar" e eu, torcendo o nariz ao nome do pacote que me parecia uma promessa de aborrecimento, aceitei porque a mera ideia de não ter os canais todos me fere a sensibilidade. E vieram os canais da Fox e com um deles mais uma série de episódios magníficos.
No canal da Fox passam várias séries que já conhecia e que nunca me suscitaram grande interesse, como é o caso dos Ficheiros Secretos, que tinha tudo para ser uma série que me agradasse, gosto de ficção científica e de horror, mas aqueles agentes do FBI são tão rígidos e self-righteous que nem os monstros e os mistérios ocasionais os conseguem levantar de um torpor absoluto. Depois havia umas coisas ligeiras, visíveis mas não entusiasmantes, passadas num casino em Las Vegas, onde o mundo higiénico da América se manifesta numas damas de peito farto e nuns cavalheiros atléticos da segurança, sem grande imaginação e nenhuma verdadeira personagem. A personagem é o casino, mas só mesmo lá estando é que se sente a coisa. O mesmo, em mais pesado, acontecia numa ilha do Pacífico onde uns "perdidos" de um acidente de avião bizarro aterram em cima duma ilha misteriosa onde ninguém faz o que o bom senso exige e todos parecem ser híbridos entre as terríveis crianças do Senhor das Moscas e a Ilha Misteriosa de Júlio Verne. Depois há umas Donas de Casa Desesperadas que nunca percebi a fama que tinham, porque é aborrecido e estereotipado, embora nos devolva um mundo que não temos na Europa que é o da "vizinhança". Compreendo que na América deve ser um sucesso entre as ditas donas de casa, que devem sonhar com maldades miméticas, mas aquelas vidas liofilizadas são tão artificiais como o casino de Las Vegas e a ilha dos "perdidos". Depois há os Simpsons que são excelentes. Ponto.
E duas magníficas surpresas, que animaram os meus dias: House e Deadwood. Deadwood, da produtora dos Sopranos HBO, é uma história do Oeste americano, da fronteira violenta e turbulenta. É uma série, como os Sopranos, que só passa na América no cabo, com a sua linguagem obscena, as cenas de bordel sem idealização, a brutalidade sempre à flor da pele de todas as personagens quer reais, quer ficcionais. É que existe uma Deadwood real no Dakota do Sul, e de facto por lá passaram várias das personagens da série televisiva, como Calamity Jane e Wild Bill Hickok, o dono do bordel, os donos de lojas, etc. No cemitério de Deadwood estão muitas das personagens reais da série, havendo outras ficcionais para dar consistência narrativa e dramática à história. No seu conjunto, todas as qualidades de encenação da televisão americana, a sua construção de personagens, o trabalho do guião, a precisão dos cenários, uma iluminação excelente para dar o efeito da escuridão das ruas e das casas apenas iluminadas por candeeiros, tudo se combina para uma excelente série televisiva. A série é tudo menos "familiar", mas vale por si só o canal da Fox onde passa.
Depois há um bónus suplementar, a série da Fox House centrada numa situação clássica de muita televisão americana, o hospital. Mais do que em Deadwood, que é um retrato de grupo, o retrato de uma cidade, House é dependente de uma personagem, o médico Gregory House representado pelo actor inglês Hugh Laurie. House é uma personagem ideal de televisão, excessiva, enchendo o ecrã com a sua mera aparição, um génio do diagnóstico diferencial (que cita o jornal do Instituto de Medicina e Higiene Tropical em português para um caso raríssimo de transmissão sexual de "doença do sono"), absolutamente insuportável de feitio, agressivo, cínico e solitário. House sofre dores violentas devido a uma doença numa perna, que arrasta com a sua bengala pelo ecrã, coxeando e tomando Vicodin às mãos cheias. O New York Times, referindo-se a esta série, escreveu: "Tão aditiva como Vicodin..."
O hospital onde House trabalha é completamente artificial, demasiado perfeito para ser verdadeiro. Nada está sujo, todos os mais complexos meios de diagnóstico existem, não faltam quartos, nem pessoal, nem remédios, por sofisticados e raros que eles sejam. Se não houvesse Gregory House, a demonstração da imperfeição genial, a série seria anódina. Mas, diferentemente das séries de hospital e de médicos, House passa quase sempre por cima do aspecto melodramático da doença, para se centrar no exercício intelectual de descobrir a causa, e sobre esse ponto de vista o grau de complexidade dos diagnósticos e a sua metodologia diferencial são uma parte fundamental da estrutura narrativa. À narração acrescenta-se a dança subjectiva da sua equipa de colaboradores, que trata abaixo de cão, e dos administradores do hospital, afectados pela violência verbal de House e as suas atitudes não convencionais. A única personagem que trata House de igual para igual é o seu colega oncologista Wilson, e os diálogos entre os dois são um dos bons retratos ficcionais da amizade de qualquer série televisiva.
House e Deadwood reconciliaram-me com o mundo das séries televisivas, que a televisão portuguesa agora afasta cuidadosamente do horário nobre, onde não entra nada que não seja em português. Há mais mundo para além do infantilismo dos concursos, telenovelas e reality shows. Num canal perto de si. Pago, mas, como não há almoços grátis, não me queixo. O almoço é bom, mesmo com gripe. Historiador

terça-feira, março 21, 2006

Entrevista a Mariano Rajoy

"Objectivo de Zapatero já não é a derrota da ETA, mas a negociação
Dois anos depois dos atentados de Atocha e da surpreendente vitória do PSOE nas eleições gerais espanholas, Mariano Rajoy esboça um retrato crítico da acção de Rodríguez Zapatero nos temas mais críticos: ETA e País Basco, estatuto da Catalunha, política de imigração. Defende a manutenção do pacto antiterrorista e assume-se como um nacionalista em política e liberal em economia. A entrevista decorreu na sede nacional do PSD. Em Lisboa, Rajoy assistiu ao congresso social- -democrata e apresentou cumprimentos ao novo Presidente.
Nasceu em Santiago de Compostela em 27 de Março de 1955

Licenciado em Direito, filiou-se em 1981 na Aliança Popular. Com Aznar, foi vice-presidente e min. do Interior. Secretário-geral do PP desde 2003


O PP tem questionado a instrução judicial sobre os atentados de 11 de Março. Com que argumentos?
Nós não pomos em causa a investigação judicial. Queremos que se investigue e, se possível, que se saiba a verdade. Sabendo a verdade, pode evitar-se que ocorram desgraças tão tremendas como essa. Mas nada mais.

Mas chegou a duvidar de algumas provas apresentadas.
Não. Houve, há dias, uma polémica e uma declaração de um comissário de polícia perante o juiz e o que pedimos foi que a questão se aclarasse.

Criticou a comissão de investigação?
A comissão acabou porque assim o decidiu a maioria da Câmara de Deputados e o Partido Socialista. Não aceitámos. Todas as pessoas que os outros partidos convocaram, foram lá; os nomes que indicámos não foram aceites. Assim, não podíamos aceitar o fecho da comissão. Agora, esperemos para ver o que dizem os tribunais.

Confia na justiça espanhola?
Por definição, sempre acato as decisões dos tribunais. Umas agradam-me mais, outras menos, mas confio.

Passemos à questão da ETA. Que críticas tem a fazer à acção do Governo?
PP e PSOE tinham um pacto até que o sr. Rodríguez Zapatero chegou a presidente do Governo. Esse pacto dizia o seguinte: a política antiterrorista nunca mudará, governe quem governar; com a ETA não se negoceia, a ETA derrota-se; nunca se deve pagar um preço político aos terroristas; faremos os possíveis para impedir que a ETA, através da Batasuna, se apresente às eleições. Tudo isso foi muito útil e eficaz e debilitou a ETA. A mudança que se produziu é que, neste momento, o objectivo não é a derrota da ETA, mas a negociação, o que, para mim, é inaceitável. Transforma o terrorismo num instrumento para conseguir fins políticos e significa romper um acordo que funcionou.

Mas Zapatero disse que não aceita negociações enquanto a ETA não depuser as armas e renunciar à violência.
Isso é o que ele diz. Mas vou dar-lhe dois dados das últimas 24 horas: o juiz da Audiência Nacional, Grande Marlasca, ordenou a prisão de dois terroristas da ETA e o procurador-geral opôs-se, o que é muito grave; e o ministro da Justiça disse que o PP faz mais ruído do que a ETA, o que é ainda mais grave. A isso há que acrescentar muitos outros factos dos últimos meses, como o Governo pretender autorizar o congresso de um partido ilegal . Não havia necessidade de mudar a política antiterrorista, que vinha de um pacto, era moral e foi eficaz.

O PP nunca negociou com a ETA?
Nunca. Em 1998, ETA decretou uma trégua, mas fê-lo unilateralmente. Então, o Governo anunciou aos partidos (que concordaram) e à opinião pública que ia falar com a ETA para ver o alcance dessa trégua. Houve uma conversa e aí foi dito à ETA que o Governo não pagaria nenhum preço político por abandonar o terrorismo. Não houve mais nenhuma conversa. A partir daí, desgraçadamente, ETA continuou com as suas acções.

Esta não poderá ser uma oportunidade para pôr fim à violência? O que critica à via seguida pelo Governo?
O Governo toma decisões equivocadas. Aprovou uma resolução no Congresso que era um convite ao diálogo - o que é um enorme erro. Faz insinuações à Batasuna, o fiscal-geral não actua com contundência , menos mal que o fazem os juízes.

Acredita que o procurador-geral está a ser influenciado pelo PSOE?
Quem é que não acredita nisso em Espanha?

Com que argumentos se opõe à última versão do estatuto da Catalunha?
Não se ajusta à Constituição. Boa parte dos seus preceitos não se entende. Para haver acordo, tiveram de fazer artigos difíceis de entender. Depois, é mau para os espanhóis e, especialmente, para os catalães. Ninguém explicou uma razão que demonstre que isto é bom para alguém. Além disso, está a gerar enorme divisão na sociedade espanhola e até nos partidos de esquerda. Quando em toda a Europa estamos num processo de integração e cedemos a nossa moeda, a política monetária, de agricultura e pescas, justiça, defesa, não podemos mudar de direcção em Espanha.

O que propõe então?
PP e PSOE são mais de 80% dos votos e do Congresso dos Deputados. Durante 26 anos, tudo isto foi objecto de pacto entre os dois grandes partidos. Sem pacto, abre-se um processo que não se sabe onde vai acabar.

Não receia ficar isolado, só na companhia da Esquerra Republicana?
Fico isolado com dez milhões de votos. O que não posso é votar numa coisa em que não acredito e em que nem sequer acreditam os que vão aprová-la. Não tem nenhum sentido considerar Catalunha uma nação, dizer que o poder da Generalitat emana do povo, criar uma relação bilateral entre Catalunha e o resto de Espanha, fixar no estatuto as competências do Estado, impor a língua.

Pode abrir um precedente?
Inicia um processo de debilitamento de um Estado que necessita, para cumprir as missões, ter competências, liberdade para exercê-las e bom financiamento.

Mas admite o desejo de mais autonomia em muitas comunidades?
Esse desejo não existe. O Estado gasta pouco mais de 20 por cento da despesa pública total (sem as pensões). As autonomias têm competência plena em todos os grandes serviços públicos: saúde, educação, serviços sociais. O Estado tem a planificação geral da economia, a política de defesa (hoje muito partilhada), a política externa e as grandes obras de infraestruturas. O nível de competências das autonomias, que já é o maior da Europa, é mais do que suficiente.

Deve e haver da invasão do Iraque

por José Manuel Fernandes, Público, 20 de Março de 2006

Há três anos defendi a invasão do Iraque. O que se passou depois trouxe-me algumas surpresas desagradáveis. Contudo, mesmo assim, continuo a pensar que a decisão foi acertada, que o mundo e o Iraque estão melhor sem Saddam Hussein e que se estão a tirar lições do erros cometidos. O mundo continua perigoso, mas ter cedido seria pior

Francisco Sarsfield Cabral desafiou em artigo recente os que apoiaram a invasão do Iraque a exprimirem-se: face a tudo o que correu mal, fá-lo-iam hoje de novo? A questão assim colocada inclui uma armadilha, pois nós sabemos o que correu mal (e também o que correu bem), mas não sabemos o que teria corrido mal ou bem sem uma intervenção para derrubar Saddam Hussein. Podemos, no entanto, ensaiar algumas previsões se tivermos a honestidade de aceitar que, primeiro, qualquer decisão política é tomada face aos dados conhecidos à época e, segundo, que existia então um grande consenso sobre as armas iraquianas. O que suscitava controvérsia era a forma de agir: mais inspecções e sanções ou guerra preventiva.
Mas vamos por partes.

Sabemos hoje que Saddam não escondia armas de destruição maciça. Pelo menos elas não foram encontradas (nem colocadas lá para "fingir" que existiam, como se escreveu em Portugal que os Estados Unidos fariam, vide texto da época de Miguel Portas). Também sabemos que se Saddam não possuía forma de fabricar armas nucleares, da mesma forma que sabemos que no Iraque existiam instalações industriais que poderiam, com fáceis adaptações, produzir armas químicas e biológicas. O que não sabemos é porque razão um regime acossado e cercado fazia bluff, isto é, por que razão estando "inocente" resistiu durante 12 anos às inspecções da ONU e, já na contagem decrescente para o conflito, continuava a não aceitar algumas das condições exigidas pelas equipas de especialistas. Daí que se deva assumir que se ocorreu um falhanço gigantesco de todos os serviços secretos ocidentais (incluindo os dos países que se opuseram à intervenção, cujos serviços produziram dos relatórios que se revelariam menos acertados, caso dos franceses), também se tenha de aceitar que todos os sinais enviados pelo regime iam no sentido de que tinha algo a esconder e não desistira dos seus programas militares.
Sabemos também hoje que os Estados Unidos (tal como a coligação que os apoiou) tinham preparado mal o pós-guerra e cometeram enormes erros nos primeiros meses da ocupação. Há muitas explicações para isso, mas a que costuma ser mais vezes repetida é a que, por influência dos neoconservadores, a Administração Bush acreditou que, depois da queda de Saddam, os iraquianos celebrariam a libertação e, por isso, não haveria resistência à democratização. Trata-se de uma explicação duplamente falsa, pois não só a imprensa neoconservadora desde a primeira hora que criticou a Administração Bush pelo défice de meios humanos, financeiros e militares colocados à disposição dos que deviam promover uma rápida reconstrução e transição, como os resultados das várias consultas eleitorais (onde participaram 12 milhões de eleitores) entretanto realizadas mostram que a esmagadora maioria dos iraquianos não apoiava o regime, tendo conduzido ao poder aqueles que se lhe opunham e eram reprimidos. Se os erros cometidos no pós-invasão mostram incompetência e impreparação, não mostram que a intervenção não devia ter ocorrido.
Sabemos também hoje - e essa é a parte mais lamentável de tudo o que se passou - que soldados e oficiais americanos e britânicos tiveram comportamentos que violam as leis da guerra, tendo os casos mais graves ocorrido na prisão de Abu Ghraib. O que aí se passou, e o facto desses acontecimentos terem sido revelados, denunciados e julgados por vivermos em democracias onde a imprensa é livre (ninguém sabe o que se passava em Abu Ghraib no tempo de Saddam, e sobretudo não existem imagens desses tempos para passarem na Al-Jazira), fez um mal tremendo à luta antiterrorista. No limite, se esse tipo de comportamentos tivessem sido o padrão generalizado - e não foram, tanto quanto hoje sabemos -, se não se tratassem apenas de excepções, a sua simples ocorrência devia levar-nos a reequacionar a defesa da intervenção militar, na linha da argumentação desenvolvida no PÚBLICO por Maria Filomena Mónica.
Sabemos por fim que o Iraque atraiu jihadistas de todo o Mundo (incluindo das comunidades "integradas" da Europa), que Zarqawi, o operacional da Al-Qaeda, já actuava no país antes da invasão e que a luta entre as diferentes comunidades religiosas mantém o país à beira da guerra civil (a qual, porém, muitos anunciavam para o dia seguinte à invasão e ainda não ocorreu). Essa situação obriga à permanência no terreno das tropas dos Estados Unidos e do Reino Unido e mostra como são limitados os recursos militares das maiores potências. Esta realidade implica desafios e sacrifícios, mas não pode nem deve levar ao maior erro de todos: o da desistência.

Mas se sabemos tudo isto, não sabemos como teria evoluído a situação caso se tivesse optado por prosseguir uma política de "contenção" então velha de 12 anos.
Por vezes há referências que se cruzam e Mário Betencourt Resendes referiu a semana passada uma obra organizada pelo historiador militar Robert Cowley, What If?, na qual vários autores especulam sobre o que poderia ter acontecido se líderes políticos ou militares tivessem tomado decisões diferentes ou certas batalhas tivessem tido outro desfecho. Por coincidência, ou talvez não, eu próprio tinha acabado de começar a ler essa obra e, na semana passada, no jornal The Times, um dos seus colunistas, Gerard Baker, antigo chefe do escritório em Washington do Financial Times, disserta sobre um moderno What If?: o que teria sucedido se Hans Blix e Mohamed ElBaradei tivessem convencido Saddam a aceitar o desarmamento incondicional. O seu texto é puramente ficcional, mas altamente verosímil, mais verosímil porventura do que alguns dos textos de historiadores do volume que referi e cuja leitura é apaixonante e instrutiva.
Ora se olharmos para o que Gerard Baker nos descreve como a evolução provável de tal cenário, evolução balizada pelo que então sucedeu no país e na região, tal remeter-nos-ia para uma actualidade porventura mais preocupante que a que vivemos. Os Estados Unidos e o Reino Unido teriam mantido na região o mesmo número de soldados pois continuariam a suspeitar das intenções de Saddam. Estas seriam atacadas por terroristas, não no Iraque, mas na Arábia Saudita e no Kuwait. A Síria manter-se-ia no Líbano, a Líbia não teria renunciado ao seu programa de armamento e o Irão teria acelerado o seu, pois sentir-se-ia mais livre do que se sentiu nos últimos anos e a diplomacia europeia teria sido tão ineficaz como foi até ao momento. E por aí adiante, com a grande diferença de que Saddam, menos vigiado, livre de sanções, também teria recomeçado a sentir-se como o novo Saladino, "libertador" de Jerusalém, agindo em conformidade.
Baker reconhece que o seu cenário não era o único possível, havendo alguns piores e outros melhores, mas não deixa de sublinhar a ideia de o julgamento da invasão do Iraque não pode ser feito apenas com base no que aconteceu de mal depois, mas no que poderia ter acontecido de pior caso a opção tivesse sido outra. Contudo, como aos decisores políticos não se pode exigir apenas "prognósticos no fim do jogo", ou que tomem decisões com base em factos que só o vieram a ser conhecidos depois de terem agido, continuo a pensar que a decisão então tomada foi a melhor naquelas circunstâncias. Sendo que existe um what if? de que poucos falam: a França ter seguido um caminho diferente, algo que talvez fosse possível se não estivesse tão envolvida nos escândalos do programa "petróleo por alimentos". O lado mais apelativo deste what if? é que existem muitos elementos que permitem acreditar que, pressionado pelos membros permanentes do Conselho de Segurança e pelos seus parceiros árabes, Saddam podia ter renunciado ao poder. Algo porém que nunca faria tendo diplomatas franceses a garantir-lhe, como sucedeu, que não haveria invasão pois não haveria segunda resolução das Nações Unidas.
O juízo final da História ainda está por fazer e restam cartas por jogar, mas para além dos erros cometidos e do que deve e está a ser corrigido, o risco do megaterrorismo obriga-nos não só a manter aberta a discussão como a encarar novos argumentos, em particular os avançados no último livro de Francis Fukuyama, de que ainda só pude ler recensões (algo críticas de resto, como a da revista The Economist) e uma extensa pré-publicação editada no The New York Times.
Não sou dos que pensam que não se pode mudar de posição e já tenho reconhecido muitas vezes que me enganei. Mas se logo em 2003 identifiquei alguns dos riscos associados à invasão, se esses riscos se concretizaram e se muita coisa correu e corre mal, feito o balanço ainda penso que o mundo e o Iraque estão melhor sem Saddam Hussein do que se ele tivesse continuado a ser o senhor de Bagdad.

É sexy liderar a oposição?

por Amílcar Correia, Público, 20 de Março de 2006

Poderá um líder da oposição, seja ele Marques Mendes ou Ribeiro e Castro, ser sexy? Como
é que se faz uma oposição sexy? É este o dilema dos partidos obrigados a um pousio
de quatro anos de poder

1. Quer Marques Mendes, quer Ribeiro e Castro, eleitos há menos de um ano, são líderes contestados no interior dos seus partidos por dirigentes que não se identificam com a forma como os dois fazem actualmente oposição. Depois da derrota socialista nas autárquicas e nas presidenciais, os dois partidos de direita mergulharam na discussão interna sobre o futuro das suas lideranças e Marques Mendes e Ribeiro e Castro procuram agora, a três anos de novas eleições legislativas, uma relegitimação dos seus mandatos.
O congresso do PSD revelou um partido pouco interessado em organizar "eventos televisivos", como eram os congressos dos sociais-democratas no passado, mas também evidenciou sinais iniludíveis do desinteresse e apatia que se vive neste momento na oposição. As críticas ficaram a cargo de Rui Gomes da Silva e de Nuno Morais Sarmento, e em parte por causa das mazelas da sucessão do santanismo, mas o consenso obtido na aprovação da eleição directa do líder acaba por se sobrepor às diferenças de opinião. No entanto, os 78 por cento de votos que Marques Mendes obteve na aprovação da sua proposta de eleição directa do líder não disfarça e não apaga o incómodo e o fastio que a sua liderança ainda provoca entre alguns sociais-democratas, como se depreende das ausências mais notadas no Pavilhão Atlântico. Na prática, o PSD é hoje um partido que só se ergue quando ouve falar de Cavaco ou de Sá Carneiro; um partido a viver dos bustos.

2. Telmo Correia, derrotado no último congresso do CDS-PP - e à semelhança de Nuno Melo ou de António Pires de Lima -, afasta a necessidade de um congresso extraordinário para discutir a liderança do partido, quando o mesmo tem um líder eleito até 2007. O argumento é prosaico: "O CDS-PP não pode andar de legitimação interna em legitimação interna, tem de falar para fora". Como diz Pires de Lima, o CDS-PP tem de ser um partido "mais sedutor e sexy". Mas a verdade é que a actual direcção do partido tem vindo a ser cada vez mais contestada, sobretudo pelos deputados escolhidos pela anterior direcção, convencidos de que os centristas deixaram de ser sexy para o eleitorado no dia em que Paulo Portas abandonou a sua liderança.
Poderá um líder da oposição, seja ele Marques Mendes ou Ribeiro e Castro, ser sexy? Como é que se faz uma oposição sexy? É este o dilema dos partidos obrigados a um pousio de quatro anos de poder. Os seus líderes são contestados internamente, mas ninguém quer dar um passo em frente para os substituir a meio de uma travessia do deserto de desfecho imprevisível. Todos os líderes são líderes a prazo. Mas os líderes da oposição ainda o são mais, porque não se limitam a defrontar o Governo e o partido que o sustenta, como se vêem também a braços com as críticas internas e o "antagonismo militante" de que se queixa o líder dos centristas. É esse o pretexto para a necessidade de Marques Mendes e de Ribeiro e Castro em renovar ciclicamente a sua liderança. Falta saber quem, nos dois partidos, poderá (e quererá) assegurar uma oposição mais sexy e sedutora ao Governo de Sócrates.

segunda-feira, março 20, 2006

Alan Moore: Our greatest graphic novelist

'From Hell', 'The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen' and now 'V For Vendetta'... Alan Moore's comics keep on being made into blockbuster films. But he won't take Hollywood's money and barely takes their calls. He tells Nicholas Barber about his 'immensely long-winded' next book and why Northampton is the centre of the world

Published: 19 March 2006, The Independent

On Friday, Warner Bros are releasing a thriller about a terrorist who bombs London. True, the hero of V For Vendetta is carrying out his campaign in an alternate, fascist Britain, but he still assassinates politicians and dynamites the Houses of Parliament, so he's hardly the most obvious poster boy for the Wachowski brothers, the makers of The Matrix, to be offering us. And if that weren't enough controversy for one Hollywood blockbuster, there's been trouble behind the scenes as well. Like so many recent films, this one is based on a comic, which usually means that that comic's original writer is battling to receive more money and more recognition. But in this case the opposite is true.

Having conceived the V For Vendetta strip as an anti-Thatcherite call-to-arms in the early 1980s, Alan Moore is refusing to take any money from the film, and has striven to have his name removed from the its posters and credits. "All I'm asking [the producers] for," he reasons, "is the same kind of deal that they had no problem extending to Siegel and Schuster [the creators of Superman]. I want them to say, 'We're not going to give you any money for your work, you're not going to get any credit for it, and we're not going to put your name on it.' I don't see the problem." His struggle to be dissociated from V For Vendetta, against the Wachowskis' will, makes for a bizarre and groundbreaking situation. But in discussions of Alan Moore - widely acclaimed as the comics medium's greatest ever writer - those adjectives are never very far away.

Born in Northampton in 1952, he made his name when he worked for two British anthology comics, 2000AD and Warrior, the latter being the birthplace of V For Vendetta. The strips he wrote were noticably wittier, more affecting and more ambitious than those of his contemporaries, and it wasn't long before he was poached by the American comics giant, DC. He scripted Batman and Superman and Swamp Thing, and while those titles might not scream cultural sophistication, Moore proved, month after month, that the lowly superhero comic could be a vehicle for poetry, social comment and graphic innovation. If there were any doubts about this, they were extinguished by Watchmen, a gloriously complex 12-part superhero series that was ranked last year as one of America's favourite novels in a Time magazine poll.

The only sticking point for Moore was that, like Siegel and Schuster decades earlier, he couldn't keep the rights to the characters he created. And so, ever since Watchmen, he has preferred to write for smaller, independent comics companies, taking less money in exchange for more rights and creative freedom. And he has continued to expand the boundaries of the medium, giving free rein to his love of formal experimentation and historical research. Among many other titles, he has delivered a 600-page exploration of the Jack the Ripper crimes (From Hell), an adventure series that teams up the heroes of Victorian literature (The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen), and a forthcoming "pornographic graphic novel" (Lost Girls), illustrated by his fiancée, Melinda Gebbie.

It's hardly surprising that Hollywood is interested in him. And, at first, Moore didn't mind its attention. "I figured that if people wanted to give me a lot of money to make a film that had only a coincidental resemblance to my work, then that was fine by me," he says when we meet in Northampton. First there was From Hell, starring Johnny Depp, then came The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, starring Sean Connery. And in both cases Moore's policy was the same: he'd take the cheque, but he'd refuse to participate in the film-making or watch the finished products. It must take an immense amount of willpower, I suggest, not to peek at a DVD of those films, just out of curiosity.

Moore disagrees. "It's not an immense amount of willpower," he says, "it's an immense amount of squeamishness. It's like, to see a line of dialogue or a character that I have poured that much emotional involvement into, to see them casually travestied and watered down and distorted... it's kind of painful. It's much better just to avoid them altogether."

That policy was satisfactory until the release of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen film. Moore's comic had been published years earlier, but that didn't stop an American screenwriter bringing a lawsuit against 20th Century Fox, claiming that he'd been plagiarised.

Moore can't recall this "dreadful fiasco" without bitter irony. "The idea that I had taken The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen from a Hollywood screenwriter - who I've not got the highest opinion of, I've got to be honest - that stung my vanity, if you like. Then I had to go down to London to do this videotaped testimony regarding the case, and I was cross-examined for 10 hours. I remember thinking that if I had raped and murdered a busful of retarded schoolchildren after selling them heroin, I probably wouldn't have been cross-examined for that long."

The suit came to nothing, but Moore had learnt his lesson. "At this point I thought, 'OK, it's obvious to me that if I'm involved in the film industry in any way, even tenuously, then I'm still leaving myself open to people saying more or less whatever they want about me. So from now on, what I will do is completely distance myself from the films.' If it's films of work I've done on my own, then I can flatly refuse to let them happen. However, since most of my work is done in collaboration [ie, Moore writes the scripts and various artists draw the pictures], that wouldn't really be fair to the artists who may have been looking forward to the money. So what I said was, 'OK, if the artists want a film to go ahead then fine, but I will just have my name taken off it and the artists can have my share of the money.'" He applied this tactic to Constantine, starring Keanu Reeves and Rachel Weisz. Although Moore had created the character of John Constantine for DC Comics, he got no cash, and no mention in the celluloid version. "I later found out that actually this was because the people who made Constantine had absolutely no intention of putting my name on it in the first place," he notes. "But that didn't matter. I'd got what I wanted."

He made the same stipulation when V For Vendetta went into production: David Lloyd, who drew the V For Vendetta strips, was to receive all of Moore's payment and credit. "Then I got a phonecall from one of the Wachowski brothers - either Curly or Moe - and he was saying that he was a huge fan of my work, and that he was doing this V For Vendetta film, at which point I interjected that he shouldn't take this personally, but I didn't wish to be associated with it. And he was asking if he could meet me, and I was saying, 'I'm just very busy at the moment,' trying as politely as possible to disengage and get back to my work. Eventually he morosely rang off. Then the next thing I heard was that there had been a press release from Warner, in which the film's producer, Joel Silver, said that I was really, really excited about this film, and that I was going to be meeting with the Wachowski brothers real soon so we could all enthuse about this exciting new cinematic possibility. Given that I'd already done interviews where I'd stated clearly that I was having nothing to do with this film, that kind of made me look like a liar."

Moore is still waiting for the "simple retraction, apology and clarification" he requested, but he has won a kind of victory: he is no longer credited onscreen or on the posters of V For Vendetta. A greater victory, though, is that his protracted wranglings with Warner haven't distracted him from work on his second prose novel, Jerusalem. "It's gonna be immensely long-winded," he says, with some relish: 750 pages, all about the working-class estate where he grew up.

Northampton is still the only town Moore has ever lived in. Now divorced, with two grown-up daughters, he occupies a Victorian terrace house which is no different from its neighbours, except for the wooden snakes entwined on the front door, and the gargoyles above the windows.

"They keep the Jehovah's Witnesses away, at least," says Moore. The supernatural theme continues inside. In between the teetering stacks of books, the paintwork is dark blue with gold stars. In the cosy front room, two sphinxes sit on the mantelpiece above the gas fire, and there are wooden panels on the wall detailing the alphabet of the angels, as transcribed by Elizabeth I's personal astrologer. "It's a kind of archeological record of my layers of obsession," says Moore, inviting me to take a seat on a zodiac-patterned settee. "There's an alcove upstairs that is a vortex of cherubs - and I really don't know where I was going with that."

Who lives in a house like this? Well, Moore himself is as recognisable, as iconic even, as any of the comic-book characters he's created. As befits a man who studies witchcraft, he has a beard straggling down to his chest, and his twinkling eyes peer between curtains of greying brown hair. "It's just laziness," he shrugs. "I really can't be bothered going to a barber. And shaving every morning, that's nightmarish. I spent my teenage years covered in tiny little bits of toilet paper."

Sinking deep into an armchair, with a tray across his knees that's laden with cigarette papers, tobacco and other substances, he talks non-stop for two hours - an upbeat Ancient Mariner. He's had no official education since he was expelled from school for selling LSD, but his knowledge of history, science and literature is astounding; it would be intimidating, too, if it weren't balanced by a jovial friendliness and a nasal Midlands brogue: "me" for "my" and "oi" for "I". Like his house, Moore is a unique mix of the mindbogglingly mystical and the affably down to earth.

When he arrived on the comics scene, companies would pay to fly him to conventions in America, where his admirers would hang on his every word. But the adulation didn't suit him, and nowadays he'd rather be "couchbound". "I enjoy putting my mind into different situations rather than my body," he says. "One of the advantages of travelling the world is that you get to know the world broadly. And one of the advantages of staying in one place is that you get to know the world deeply. You don't just see the physical landscape that you're passing through. You get to see how all these little threads of genealogy actually pan out over the decades. You get a very deep sense of human community and the human experience. And if you understand one place deeply enough, you can probably understand all the elements that you need in any human community. And you can probably write about absolutely anywhere."

For now, though, he's writing about Northampton, and he's convinced that it's the centre of England - geographically, financially, emotionally and morally. "And it's not just me saying this," he adds.

"It's actually God. In the eighth century, there was a monk who visited Golgotha..." And off he goes on a whirlwind tour of Northampton through the ages, stopping off at King John, Thomas a Becket, the Romans, the Saxons, the Crusades, Wat Tyler, James Joyce and Dusty Springfield. And then, pausing only to continue building a multi-Rizla'd edifice that's almost as ingeniously constructed as one of his comics, he explains how time is the shadow of the fourth dimension, and how "for no reason at all" he's writing one chapter of Jerusalem in "disguised iambic pentameter".

Somewhere, in among all that hair, his face lights up, and the Wachowski brothers, Hollywood, and V For Vendetta all seem a long way away.
>

On Friday, Warner Bros are releasing a thriller about a terrorist who bombs London. True, the hero of V For Vendetta is carrying out his campaign in an alternate, fascist Britain, but he still assassinates politicians and dynamites the Houses of Parliament, so he's hardly the most obvious poster boy for the Wachowski brothers, the makers of The Matrix, to be offering us. And if that weren't enough controversy for one Hollywood blockbuster, there's been trouble behind the scenes as well. Like so many recent films, this one is based on a comic, which usually means that that comic's original writer is battling to receive more money and more recognition. But in this case the opposite is true.

Having conceived the V For Vendetta strip as an anti-Thatcherite call-to-arms in the early 1980s, Alan Moore is refusing to take any money from the film, and has striven to have his name removed from the its posters and credits. "All I'm asking [the producers] for," he reasons, "is the same kind of deal that they had no problem extending to Siegel and Schuster [the creators of Superman]. I want them to say, 'We're not going to give you any money for your work, you're not going to get any credit for it, and we're not going to put your name on it.' I don't see the problem." His struggle to be dissociated from V For Vendetta, against the Wachowskis' will, makes for a bizarre and groundbreaking situation. But in discussions of Alan Moore - widely acclaimed as the comics medium's greatest ever writer - those adjectives are never very far away.

Born in Northampton in 1952, he made his name when he worked for two British anthology comics, 2000AD and Warrior, the latter being the birthplace of V For Vendetta. The strips he wrote were noticably wittier, more affecting and more ambitious than those of his contemporaries, and it wasn't long before he was poached by the American comics giant, DC. He scripted Batman and Superman and Swamp Thing, and while those titles might not scream cultural sophistication, Moore proved, month after month, that the lowly superhero comic could be a vehicle for poetry, social comment and graphic innovation. If there were any doubts about this, they were extinguished by Watchmen, a gloriously complex 12-part superhero series that was ranked last year as one of America's favourite novels in a Time magazine poll.

The only sticking point for Moore was that, like Siegel and Schuster decades earlier, he couldn't keep the rights to the characters he created. And so, ever since Watchmen, he has preferred to write for smaller, independent comics companies, taking less money in exchange for more rights and creative freedom. And he has continued to expand the boundaries of the medium, giving free rein to his love of formal experimentation and historical research. Among many other titles, he has delivered a 600-page exploration of the Jack the Ripper crimes (From Hell), an adventure series that teams up the heroes of Victorian literature (The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen), and a forthcoming "pornographic graphic novel" (Lost Girls), illustrated by his fiancée, Melinda Gebbie.

It's hardly surprising that Hollywood is interested in him. And, at first, Moore didn't mind its attention. "I figured that if people wanted to give me a lot of money to make a film that had only a coincidental resemblance to my work, then that was fine by me," he says when we meet in Northampton. First there was From Hell, starring Johnny Depp, then came The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, starring Sean Connery. And in both cases Moore's policy was the same: he'd take the cheque, but he'd refuse to participate in the film-making or watch the finished products. It must take an immense amount of willpower, I suggest, not to peek at a DVD of those films, just out of curiosity.

Moore disagrees. "It's not an immense amount of willpower," he says, "it's an immense amount of squeamishness. It's like, to see a line of dialogue or a character that I have poured that much emotional involvement into, to see them casually travestied and watered down and distorted... it's kind of painful. It's much better just to avoid them altogether."

That policy was satisfactory until the release of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen film. Moore's comic had been published years earlier, but that didn't stop an American screenwriter bringing a lawsuit against 20th Century Fox, claiming that he'd been plagiarised.

Moore can't recall this "dreadful fiasco" without bitter irony. "The idea that I had taken The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen from a Hollywood screenwriter - who I've not got the highest opinion of, I've got to be honest - that stung my vanity, if you like. Then I had to go down to London to do this videotaped testimony regarding the case, and I was cross-examined for 10 hours. I remember thinking that if I had raped and murdered a busful of retarded schoolchildren after selling them heroin, I probably wouldn't have been cross-examined for that long."

The suit came to nothing, but Moore had learnt his lesson. "At this point I thought, 'OK, it's obvious to me that if I'm involved in the film industry in any way, even tenuously, then I'm still leaving myself open to people saying more or less whatever they want about me. So from now on, what I will do is completely distance myself from the films.' If it's films of work I've done on my own, then I can flatly refuse to let them happen. However, since most of my work is done in collaboration [ie, Moore writes the scripts and various artists draw the pictures], that wouldn't really be fair to the artists who may have been looking forward to the money. So what I said was, 'OK, if the artists want a film to go ahead then fine, but I will just have my name taken off it and the artists can have my share of the money.'" He applied this tactic to Constantine, starring Keanu Reeves and Rachel Weisz. Although Moore had created the character of John Constantine for DC Comics, he got no cash, and no mention in the celluloid version. "I later found out that actually this was because the people who made Constantine had absolutely no intention of putting my name on it in the first place," he notes. "But that didn't matter. I'd got what I wanted."

Graphic novels a literary phenomenon

Sales triple to $245 million US last year

Nick Lewis, Calgary Herald
Published: Monday, March 20, 2006

CALGARY -- Once the shy and quiet cousin of the comic book, graphic novel sales have soared past those of comic books to become a full-blown literary phenomenon.
With film adaptations of V For Vendetta, Sin City and A History of Violence (and North Vancouver's Budget Monks Productions' online graphic novel Broken Saints sold to Fox for a DVD box set) having been big on the cultural radar, sales of the source material have been soaring. Graphic novels were a $75-million US industry in 2001; they more than tripled to $245 million last year.
"They've risen dramatically to the point where they've doubled our comic book sales," says Martin Rouse, owner of Phoenix Comics in Calgary.
"Some weeks we'll sell 2,000 new issue comics and 3,000 graphic novels. Some weeks, 4,000 graphic novels. It's 50 to 100 per cent more, on any given week. And I don't see that changing; if anything, it'll get higher."
Unlike a comic book, which, like a soap opera, carries its storyline through several issues, a graphic novel is a stand-alone story in comic book style -- hence the term "novel".
Which is why fans such as Calgarian Erin Collins, who estimates he spent nearly $10,000 on comics and graphic novels in the '80s, say they're the perfect medium to transfer to film.
"It's easier to make a movie out of a graphic novel than a comic book, because it's a self-contained, 100-page screenplay with all the storyboards," he says. "It's easier to extract a Sin City story than a Spider-Man one, which is spread over thousands of comics. That's the logical reason why they're making so many film adaptations."
The relationship is working out well for movies, too.
The first two Alan Moore graphic novels that were made into films (From Hell and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen) combined for near $100 million at the box office. His V For Vendetta and the upcoming The Watchmen could easily eclipse that figure.
Stephen Weiner is the author of Faster than a Speeding Bullet: The Rise of the Graphic Novel, and The 101 Best Graphic Novels. He says Hollywood is but one small factor in this explosion.
"For Hollywood, I think it has less to with it being a graphic novel and more about it just being another source of material," he says. "And because graphic novels have a rebel, an outlaw status to them, it offers the sort of excitement that you don't get from a standard story. A movie like American Splendor, I knew people who had no idea that was a graphic novel, they figure he was just some weird guy."
But there are other, more significant reasons, Weiner says.
"Another reason is these days there are more 'literary' graphic novels being written that reach a far bigger audience," he says. "There's also a very large public library movement to get graphic novels in collections. And another reason is the Japanese manga market, which is so big that it's brought in this whole energy into the American comic book market.
"And all of these reasons just feed off one another."
Some graphic novels have been recognized as serious literature and works of art.

terça-feira, março 14, 2006

Metro chega a Vila do Conde com muitas obras por fazer

Ângelo Teixeira Marques

Mário Almeida chegou a pedir o adiamento da inauguração do último troço da Linha Vermelha, mas acabou por voltar atrás


O presidente da Câmara de Vila do Conde confidenciou ontem que, "há oito dias", propusera o adiamento da abertura da linha do metro entre Pedras Rubras e a Póvoa de Varzim (o troço que falta para ser completada a Linha Vermelha e que será inaugurado no próximo sábado) face ao atraso na realização de obras de "inserção urbanística", uma expressão que, aliás, o autarca abomina e que entende dever ser substituída por "obras complementares". Esta posição de Mário Almeida só foi alterada depois de, no passado sábado, a comissão executiva da empresa ter concluído uma vistoria aos muitos problemas que estão por resolver. O autarca assegura ter obtido garantias de que serão realizados trabalhos para minorar os "incómodos" que acredita que vão suceder.
Mário Almeida pareceu estar a jogar pelo seguro face a possíveis problemas ou contestações (ainda ontem a Comissão de Utentes da Linha da Póvoa mostrava na sua página da Internet diversas fotografias com cartazes espalhados em Vila do Conde onde se critica o serviço de metropolitano) e não se cansa de dizer que, no conselho de administração da Metro do Porto, defendeu opções diferentes daquelas que foram tomadas por aquele órgão, nomeadamente quanto ao envio para o Governo de todas as adjudicações relativas a obras complementares. Só isto, assevera, atrasou diversas empreitadas. "[Esta semana] deve chegar [à Metro] a indicação do Governo que me dava razão", avançou.

Trânsito complicado junto à EN13 e EN206
Embora tenha utilizado um tom suave, o certo é que, analisando o conteúdo do que Mário Almeida transmitiu ontem, a vida não será fácil para os vila-condenses. A situação mais complicada, admitiu o presidente, deverá suceder na cidade, que passa a contar com cinco estações (Santa Clara, Vila do Conde, Alto de Pega, Portas Fronhas e S. Brás) onde há muitos problemas por resolver. Na Avenida de Bernardino Machado, por exemplo, será construído um parque de estacionamento provisório, mas nem sequer foi lançado o concurso para a construção de uma estrada entre a zona da ponte e a meia-laranja.
Para além do mais, o metro cortou diversas vias e como não foram acauteladas alternativas verifica-se que, nesta altura, o "lugar de Caseiros está isolado" e, como tal, terá de surgir até sábado uma solução provisória. Falta ainda uma ligação da estação de Vila do Conde à EN13 e, talvez um dos casos mais complicados, em Portas-Fronhas, enquanto não for construída uma rotunda, vão cair sete vias sobre o cruzamento da EN13 (Valença-Porto) com a EN206 (Vila do Conde-Famalicão) e a Avenida de D. António Bento Martins Júnior, um dos principais acessos à praia das Caxinas. Tudo porque os trabalhos para criar esse distribuidor de tráfego só devem arrancar depois do Verão.

Concursos para obras fora do concelho esta semana
Nas freguesias fora do concelho, só esta semana, adiantou Mário Almeida, "estão a ser abertos concursos de concepção/construção para empreitadas relativas à variante à Rua da Mota em Aveleda [a partir de Vilar do Pinheiro], ao acesso à antiga Estação de Modivas, à via florestal desde a Gândara Nova até à Estação Espaço Natureza [ em Mindelo] e à alternativa à rua do Corgo, em Azurara".
O presidente da Câmara de Vila do Conde também não conseguiu que fossem aceites as suas sugestões para um tarifário especial para pessoas mais carenciadas ou para os utentes de longas distâncias, como são os casos dos passageiros da Póvoa e de Vila do Conde.
Mário Almeida considera ainda "fundamental" que seja efectuado "um estudo do movimento de pessoas" para apurar se, nas ligações "expresso", se justifica a paragem noutra estação do território de Vila do Conde em vez de uma única paragaem em Pedras Rubras (no concelho da Maia), como vai suceder "por razões de ordem técnica".

BE critica autarcas pela "degradação do serviço"


O núcleo do Bloco de Esquerda (BE) da Póvoa de Varzim e de Vila do Conde responsabiliza os presidentes das câmaras dos dois concelhos, Macedo Vieira e Mário Almeida, respectivamente, "pela degradação do serviço de transportes na Linha da Póvoa". "Sendo accionistas e administradores, conduziram o processo no sentido de secundarem o transporte e a mobilidade às obras de requalificação urbana dos seus concelhos", criticam os bloquistas. O BE repudia um tarifário com "aumentos brutais", os quais, alega, "são contraproducentes com o objectivo de atrair utentes do automóvel" e "não têm justificação no aumento de qualidade nem no aumento da inflação". Com o objectivo de melhorar o serviço, o BE reclama "a compra de viaturas com maior capacidade e comodidade, os tram-train", e a "a oferta de duas composições rápidas por hora com paragem em Mindelo e Vilar do Pinheiro, substituindo [a paragem] em Pedras Rubras".

segunda-feira, março 13, 2006

Chamadas eróticas pagas com terrenos

Luís Martins, in JN, 13 de Março 2006

Portugal Telecom (PT) leva, hoje, à praça, no Tribunal da Guarda, três terrenos penhorados à Junta de Freguesia do Rochoso para cobrar parte de uma dívida superior a 50 mil euros, mais juros de mora contabilizados desde 1998. Uma conta de telefone avultada que resultou das chamadas eróticas efectuadas por um anterior presidente da Junta, que se demitiu pouco depois de rebentar o escândalo.
A acção de execução sumária dos bens imóveis da autarquia vem culminar oito anos de tentativas frustradas para liquidar o montante em causa. Mas não se pense que a PT vai receber muito com esta licitação. No total, poderá encaixar 3100 euros por três terrenos de pastagem confiscados pelo Tribunal, em Dezembro de 2004. Umas "migalhas" face aos montantes apurados desde 1998 com os telefonemas de valor acrescentado efectuados pelo ex-presidente na sede da Junta.
Nesse ano, José Pires Sanches, eleito nas autárquicas de 1997, numa lista independente, foi obrigado a demitir-se de funções ao ser confrontado com uma volumosa conta de telefone, telefonemas realizados em apenas dois meses e meio. O caso foi parar a tribunal, mas o Ministério Público arquivou a queixa-crime contra o autarca.
Na localidade, situada a cerca de 20 quilómetros da Guarda, o passado já lá vai e ninguém quer recordar o assunto. "Infelizmente, quando se fala no Rochoso é só por causa disso. Porque não se preocupam com os problemas do abastecimento de água e deixam o homem em paz", atira uma habitante.
De poucas palavras é igualmente o autarca local. Joaquim Vargas, eleito na lista de José Pires Sanches, em 1997, também preferiria que a Comunicação Social falasse de "tudo o que se tem feito de bom no Rochoso", uma aldeia com pouco mais de 340 habitantes. Para o autarca, reeleito em Outubro nas listas do PS, o caso é muito simples "Não é possível pagarmos aquele montante, mas também porque a dívida não nos pode ser imputada", defende-se. E garante que a sua liquidação implicaria "a falência" da pequena autarquia, pois "dispomos de muito poucas receitas próprias. O dinheiro que temos vem da Câmara da Guarda para fazermos obras. Era o fim de tudo", avisa.
Quem não vai desistir é a PT. "Não houve abertura dos eleitos para resolver o problema com um acordo, pelo que se passou para a execução da sentença. A Junta foi condenada e, por isso, vai ter de pagar. Nós vamos prosseguir com a acção até ao fim para garantirmos o pagamento do dinheiro devido", garante fonte do gabinete jurídico da PT. Contudo, a cobrança pode revelar-se difícil de concretizar por falta de bens de valor suficiente para repor os mais de 50 mil euros em causa.

Tudo começou quando a PT moveu um processo cível contra a Junta para exigir o pagamento de mais de 50 mil euros, mais juros de mora. Mas a primeira sentença foi-lhe desfavorável, tendo recorrido para a Relação de Coimbra, que condenou a Junta a pagar. Em 2000, a PT ainda tentou acordar o pagamento em prestações, mas o Executivo foi intransigente e recusou suportar um crédito, que sempre considerou não ser seu. Avançou então a penhora dos bens. O que também foi difícil, já que só no final de 2004 se conseguiu arrestar algo. É que a primeira penhora dos bens móveis da Junta foi contestada pelo Executivo, com o argumento de que os bens públicos não podem ser penhorados. A Junta ganhou, após demonstrar que "não conseguia prestar o serviço público que lhe compete" sem esses equipamentos. Os bens imóveis são, agora, a última hipótese, possuindo a PT uma relação dos mesmos.